The Power of Labels

Degrade -d  

  • treat or regard with contempt or disrespect
  • lower the character or quality of
  • reduce to a lower rank, especially as a punishment

Synonyms: demean, debase, cheapen, devalue, shame, humiliate, mortify, abase, dishonor, dehumanize, brutalize, lossy

 


Original   

  • present or existing from the beginning; first or earliest
  • created directly and personally by a particular artist; not a copy or imitation

Synonyms: authentic, genuine, actual, true, bona fide, kosher, archetype, prototype, source, master, lossless

 


Do you think mp3 would be nearly as popular if it was called the devalued version or dehumanized version? 

Do you think lossless would be ignored by the masses if it was called the original version or the true version?

Of course not – this is the power of labels. Marketers and politicians understand this and use it against us. We must see through the subtle brainwashing, this trick of words.


TLmatched

This is not an audio wave but it caught your eye didn’t it?


Lossy sounds like a cool nickname on purpose. It’s all marketing. They figured out how to sell us less for the same and have been doing it for nearly 16 years now.

The various limitations requiring degradation of our fucking music have expired – leaving only greed.

dictionary-page

 

 

You Touch Me I Hear The Sound of Mandolins

Awesome rendition of this magical song written for a 1957 movie that I personally first heard performed by David Bowie in the 70’s. This is the amazing Nina Simone going way back to 1959:

[I’m having deja vu on this post, I’ll check after posting it if it’s a duplicate. Well it is based on an emotion, so it’s duplicates are valid.]

A Tale Of Two Setups

I was in my new all-analog studio last night with a simple task – dump from the 4-track tape machine to something digital so I could share the tracks just recorded with the artists.


 

RS-56S_UTC_equaliser_(1950s,60s),_Abbey_Road_Studios


First I needed to do a little bit of a mix on the tracks. I loaded up tape #1, went to my cue point, rolled tape, and worked on patching in some reverb and some parametric EQ. I twiddled with that for a few minutes in the speakers until I was happy. I switched between 2 sets of speakers and then realized my headphone amp wasn’t getting signal. I patched that in and tested my mix using 2 sets of headphones: good & earbud. OK all set, let’s get digital!


 

During the work above I was using devices made over nearly a 50 year range. They all plugged into each other using standard connectors and levels. These connectors are available everywhere cheaply, made by thousands of manufacturers. Almost every device had clear buttons, lights, and panels to understand and manipulate the audio. No drivers or software was needed.


 

Time to fire up my Focusrite interface, a nice piece of digital kit that’s about 4 years old now. It’s primary job is to convert analog to digital and vice-versa, back out to analog again. I attach the firewire cable to the back of the focusrite, plug it in to the wall, and then grab my mac.

Oh damn, where’s the firewire port on this thing? I got a new mac a couple months back and hadn’t used this one for recording anything yet. No firewire port. Not even Firewire 800. Not 400. None. I guess I need an adapter to get to the lightning port. Not available to me at that moment, not standard, not used for anything else. Great, I can’t connect the interface to this mac, not tonight.


Focusrite_Saffire_PRO_14

 


OK never mind the interface, I’m coming out of the mixer in 2 track so I can just go into the line-in headphone jack and let the mac do the conversion. Bedroom producers have been doing this trick for 20 years now.

I find a RCA-to-mini plug in the drawer and run tape out from the mixing board into the mac. Launch Garageband.  Back on track.


Garageband says “thanks for purchasing garageband from the app store!” I don’t remember purchasing this. Why the excitement?

“Garageband needs to download samples and loops in order to launch.” I don’t want samples or loops, I just need to record from the line in!

But I have no choice. Garageband goes about 15 minutes downloading and installing things I don’t want or need.

Meanwhile I turn to the tape machine and roll to the next track. I decide I want compression instead of the EQ on this track so I patch in a few different compressors until I find the one I like. Write down my settings on my log paper.


 

Garageband is done installing itself again. I get a wizard offering me everything under the sun except basic recording. I select ‘Hip-Hop’ thinking this might be closest to basic. Haha, stupid! No way I need MPC’s and a thousand loops. Delete this session.


 

Studer_A810_BBC_Studio_Reel_to_Reel_Master_Tape_Recorder


OK, I find basic recording and I try to arm track 1 coming in from line in. That’s when the bad news hits:  this mac has no line in. It has a port that looks like a line in, exactly like the previous model’s, but it’s not a line in.

The only sound the mac will accept is from it’s own microphone or a microphone on an iPhone headset plugged into the mac through this mystery port. I find the documentation to back it up – I need a USB or lightning port interface to get audio in.

Damn. Apple, what were you thinking? Yes lots of people have interfaces, but lots of people fall back on their line in during emergencies or for simple 2-track needs. Big Fail.


 

So the analog world managed to cooperate and work with over 4 decades of gear. My digital world failed in under 1.

To think that you continually need a new interface every 3 years just to get audio in makes the mac far less of a production machine, and bodes bad for the digitally-dominated future.

How quickly will things go obsolete, how much will our culture suffer from a lack of backward compatibility?

Dawg Gone Analog

It’s happening. I’ve considered and planned and anticipated this for 15+ years. But always compromised.

I’m going analog at the studio. Direct to tape. Outboard gear. No DAW. No computers needed at all.

The real deal. Why wait any longer?

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YOLO sly, yolo

Why? One Word. Workflow. [whoo!]

New Studio’s Primary Rule: NO SCREENS = EARS MAKE ALL DECISIONS. EYES MAKE NONE.

MISSION STATEMENT:  NO SCREENS.  EARS MAKE ALL DECISIONS.  EYES MAKE NONE.

Here’s some initial thoughts –

  • I will track to tape.
  • I might live-mix bounces and direct to 2-track final mixes.
  • Patchbays!
  • I can only afford 4-track 1/4″ tape decks right now, but it could be a stepping stone.
  • Most of my vintage compressors, preamps, mics and processors can finally be put to proper use.
  • Yes…. there will be a digital interface and something digitizing stem mixes from the tape machine for backup, recall, and perhaps future use. It will be also be optional, hidden by default, and have no visible screen.

The bottom line is no screens — we will get a sound from the instrument(s), work with the mic(s) and the input, track to tape, then move onto next layer using only your ears and available dials and knobs.

 

TS_010

This is the analog version of a hard drive full of plug-ins. Except these sound better. And have knobs.

 

I know I’m swimming upstream here. It’s not my first time on that trip.

salmonswimming

Quality swimming up the river Convenience

 

Even the founder of the magazine Tape Op, the bible amongst analog types and tape ops, said on a 2014 panel “someone buying a 1980-era consumer-level 4-track is the least exciting thing to me right now”.

Someone buying a 1980-era consumer-level 4-track is the least exciting thing to me right now – Larry Crane, Tape Op Editor

A slap down from tape jesus himself! But alas, I will work to prove him wrong. My 1980’s era TEAC 4-track tape deck passed it’s exam last night and should be ready for sessions any day now. My studio is shifting into a new mode and it’s all about workflow, limitations, and performance pressure.

 

Cliff Notes on the Loudness Wars

With master quality HD audio getting into people’s ears and getting more buzz every day, I think its important to look into one of the related issues in recorded music: The Loudness Wars.

It really does get to the core of the industry vs. art debate, the present vs. the past & future.

I support a wide dynamic range and have trouble listening to most modern music because of the loudness problem. Even classic artists that I love have put out records in the last 10 years that are so friggin’ loud they crush my ears on first note, and not in the good way. Pure fatigue.

This video covers the industry pressure and competition driving the volume problem.

But there are two other battlefields in this war: the playback systems used to render our music and the production tools used to make our music. Both are bloody battles between quality and convenience.

I’ve been covering the playback side of things with iPhones and PonoPlayers for the last few years, I’m going to start covering the production side of things soon.

 

 

Loudness Wars Research

I’ve really been exploring my music collection lately* and along with the playback quality of the PonoPlayer, I’ve learned some things about the hated concept of “loudness wars”:

 

  1. I can really hear it start up in the early 90’s with hard rock records from G’NR, Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, those types. There is a noticeable louder average volume but there are still dynamics. Instruments still sound natural, just amplified and then compressed analog, and the final mastering mix is pumped up. I suspect they tracked with tons of headroom and let the mastering engineer pull most of it out and boost away since the CD format could handle it. You can still hear natural distortion and plenty of natural room interplay.
  2. By the late 90’s, dance music (especially from the islands) was pumped and exploring automated multichannel compression provided by digital recording systems. Most American rock was dying at the hands of rap-rock and drum replacement software.
  3. By 2003, software that could do extreme compression and trickery was prevalent, so it ends up as artist and producer choice, and most went all-in with digital and robotic, looped music makes headway. MP3’s and iDevices took over the listener market in these years.
  4. By 2010 releases appear about 50% louder than their early 90’s counterparts, and laptops are on stage as well as in the studio, and most people have accepted the sonic downgrade masked as the modern sound. These years appear louder and bigger at first, but immediately tire your ears and upon further listening the mp3 “scratchy paper bag” sound is heard. Trickery is the main game in town in all popular genre’s.
  5. In 2015 the general public seems to be open to an improvement, even though most new releases are very much guilty of being too loud. No one is impressed by music (mp3) anymore. It’s everywhere, plays from anything, and usually sounds horrible. My generation is burdened with the “oh yeah” whimsical look when someone mentions sound quality.

 

Luckily, I’m not the only one noticing this. Check out this amazing ditty about the last 30 years in music creation:

 

 

*After spending the last couple of years exploring online collections, I’ve discovered that I have a pretty amazing collection of over 3000 pieces of music built over the last 35 years and that it’s primary problem has been it’s total lack of organization. Only 5% made it into iTunes as lossy files. So I’ve begun to put all of my digital music into a single lossless collection and am also finally building a computerized index of my vinyl.  When complete, I’ll have a single database of all the music I own, and that’s very exciting to me!

 

 

Recording Quality Rule Of Thumb

Allow me to speak some truth about the recording arts — the overall quality of music production has been going down since before I started. I’ve done nothing to reverse the trend ;-).

This is due to multiple factors not least of which is the march of technology and the reduction of overall recording budgets bootlegging has brought us.

How much would you spend on producing an album that most of your actual fans won’t even purchase?

Continue reading

Best Thing Ever

Lofty headline, no?

Music is life. Perhaps we should all play music to each other, that might be a better world.

Instead we developed technology to record the music so we can play it on demand without musicians present.

After a few decades of standing in front of a microphone it grew into a new art form called recorded music. It’s the art form I probably enjoy the most daily, and one that I have practiced occasionally.

Here is an interesting wikipedia overview of what I love most, multitrack recording.

 

Lots of Gadgets Are Spying On You

I covered it last week here. Samsung gets called out for their smart TV’s listening and transmitting everything we say to a third party. Very 1984. You might have thought ‘Samsung isn’t the only one doing it’ – and you would be right: Lots of other gadgets are spying on you.

Do you really need to talk to your devices, when a simple button press works just as well?

Word of the Day: Provenance

Provenance - Noun : originsourceplace of originbirthplace, fountrootspedigreederivationroot

You hear it on antiques shows and now you hear about it in digital music, and it’s actually pretty cool because it’s about credits and the people behind the music.

One of the many complaints about mp3 was “where are the credits?”.  Sorry, go to the website. But the website can update all the time, what if I just want the proper credits for my own music lover nerdiness?

There’s a more serious side to it also, one of attribution and authenticity. Algorithms can now determine what song is playing and credit the composer and lyricist, but they cannot determine origin of the file (which version from which mastering session).

As MP3 fades in popularity and we look to the next digital format, efforts are being taken to improve this issue of provenance in music. Sites like ProStudioMasters.com list details of which version you are buying but standardization is needed here.


My provenance proposal, off the top of my head:

Top level (spine):  Artist / Song / Cover art

Sub level (liner): Lyrics / Liner notes / Additional artwork

Physical level (provenance): Year / Composer / BPM / ISRC / Label / Label Number / Original Mix date / Original Mix format / Remaster Date / Remaster format


[This data could be used by next-gen streaming too, giving lots of interesting information and images to be displayed while the song streams.]

Pure Sound Quality

Quality:

  1. GoodMusic as MP3  =  sounds pretty good – get your jam on!
  2. GoodMusic as 16bit FLAC  or   CD  =  sounds better – damn listen to that bass! – time to dance – pure and clean and timeless
  3. GoodMusic as 24bit FLAC  or  Vinyl  =   oh wow am I in the studio? Is the artist in my room with me? Am I crying? This is outstanding and I don’t want to go back.

vs. Convenience:

  1. GoodMusic as MP3  =  easiest and everywhere
  2. GoodMusic as CD  =  barely surviving in cars and clubs
  3. GoodMusic as Vinyl  =  you are a manual no mix/playlist throwback and can’t take that mobile at all, totally dusty and crusty
  4. GoodMusic as FLAC   =  as easy as MP3 if you load onto your player, because it’s not going to stream reliably anytime soon

 

If you are willing to swim back up that river just a little bit – to owning and carrying your own music on a little player – you can enter a whole new world of sound quality and not lose much convenience at all.

 

gotta do what you gotta do

gotta do what you gotta do

Pre-CD Grandeur

Great write up on a classic opera recording finally being released properly in HD/Hi-Res audio:

Rediscovering Maria Callas in High-Resolution Audio

Internet experts continue to argue and debate about hi-res, but music lovers that consider themselves real listeners (not just background music) have heard a nice improvement when going to 24 bit for a long time now.

The Diva

The Diva

40 Years of Recorded Music Distribution

Vintage baby

Vintage jams

Quick history lesson —

Digital audio made it’s public debut with the CD standard known as “RedBook”, started in 1978. A collaboration between Phillips & Sony, the CD standard was originally going to be 14bit/40k with error correction and ship on a 115mm disc, but Sony pushed for 16bit/44k with no error correction. A VP of Sony also pushed to increase the total run-time from 60 minutes to 74 minutes, warranting the disc be enlarged to 120mm, and ruining Phillips’ early investment in a plant already printing the 115mm discs! Corporate intrigue for sure.

The RedBook standard was finalized in 1980 and CD players started hitting the shelves by 1982. To this day RedBook is owned by Phillips and costs a manufacturer over $300 to download the specifications. Why the name RedBook? The engineers compiling the specifications did so in a red binder. Engineers aren’t known for creativity ;-).

In the marketplace, the new digital CD’s had numerous advantages over the two existing analog formats of vinyl albums and cassettes. To list a few: no dust problems, little heat warping, less vibration-induced skipping, couldn’t unwind or tangle, vertical storage no longer needed, no replaceable stylus, not magnetic, liquid-proof, instant auto cue. Also there’s the indefinite duplication with no loss in quality on the copy or the original – that’s a huge advantage for digital.

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But CD’s did not clearly “sound better” than vinyl when all the other issues were addressed. Most of those issues are considered interference or physical media issues. None of them address how the actual recorded music is presented. All music sounds best live, as the microphone is not able to recreate our auditory system. Did CD’s actually sound “better” than analog once playback and media issues were addressed?

This has been a sticking point since the early 80’s. Many of us could hear something missing from CD’s, and it wasn’t just dust and motor noise from the turntable. It was the stuff that is nearly impossible to describe in words: reverbs and decays were different, the timbre of cymbals, voices, and stringed instruments were different, the mid-lows weren’t as warm or round, delays didn’t seem as present or accurate, the stereo-width wasn’t as obvious, the center was hard to find, the top was very pronounced and brittle, some complained of a boxy sound or a digital graininess.

The 1980’s didn’t just bring CD’s to market, it brought us personal computers and the early internet. By 1990 the same group that was working on the JPEG digital picture compression standard starting working on a media compression format. MPEG was designed for squashing CD-quality audio files small enough to stream on dial-up modems. By the mid-90’s the mpeg format was in use and competing with other early digital audio formats like RealAudio.

Now that the music could be squashed to an easily tradable size, piracy ran rampant. The late 1990’s brought us mp3 (after mpeg-1 and mpeg-2). Napster, peer to peer file sharing, bad DRM attempts (security on audio files), and ultimately led to a rapid decline of the music industry. Everything was being stolen and fewer hard copies were selling. The new mp3 files were perfect for trading online, and the novelty of this new convenience outranked the decline in sound quality. “Good enough” became the standard for sound quality.

Into this disaster stepped Apple, wisely seeing an opportunity to re-invent the personal audio player like the Walkman/Discman (stealing that market from Sony) and re-invent the record store (taking that market from traditional retailers). First they launched the player line “iPod” with it’s easy loading from your computer, then they opened the new record store with legal $1 songs and no-hassle purchasing.

Apple bet right and it took off (I bought music from there for a few years). I kept thinking I was getting ripped off though — where’s the hard copy with artwork that I can love, lose, find, loan out, break and buy another (or not?). All gone. Instead of our society going “paperless”, we went “album less”, to our detriment. We have been buying and streaming low-quality audio for over a decade now, and not always because of technical limitations.

That’s the end of this lesson, kiddies. The point here is that if you grew up in the mp3 era, you were listening to a compromise built on top of a compromise. 24bit HD Audio should be a revelatory listen for you.

 

Quick Studio Funk with Larry Dunn & Foley

Just a glimpse into the sessions for Foley’s killer 1993 release “7 Years Ago….Directions In Smart-Alec Music” featuring some keyboard love from original EWF player Larry Dunn, with a quick glimpse of GC at the end.

Hey was that Foley playing drums for P-funk last week? He had a hoodie on the whole show and I was waaaay in the back.

The Pressure Is On, or Why I Decided To Record An Entire Album In One Weekend

I’ve produced quite a few songs at this point for a variety of artists and styles. I’ve also released many of my own productions – countless hours in the dark studio clicking, sliding, and space bar-ing my life away.

This spring is time for a change, a new challenge: Roaming Crazy is going to record an entire album in a weekend marathon recording session, and we are going to film the whole ordeal for a documentary.

RC_SheepsBumper

See, this is how we live. Being an independent artist in the 21st century is a strange existence, one that never seems to be documented besides the content of the creation itself. This challenge is the largest the band has ever faced, and the largest this producer has ever faced.

In short, there will plenty of opportunity for drama and fun so we are bringing a camera crew with us through the journey.

(BTW – I do hate most reality TV, so I’m going to be uncomfortable with the cameras around, but I think there is an excellent story to be told so I’m gonna go along.)

The plan is to make the best Roaming Crazy album we can in the shortest amount of time, at the lowest budget. This will not be 1-mic in the corner rehearsal punk rock stuff, this will be a full Flux-adel Multi-track Production. We will be using every bit of our resources in the name of ART and ROCK AND ROLL, amen!

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Plus there’s a little addition — YOU could be in the documentary. We are looking for recorded opinions on our chances, reviews of our song and sound, or whatever you want to send/post. Turn your camera phone on and sound off.

Ever heard of a band doing this? Think it’s a horrible idea? Need your gorgeous face in our goofy documentary? Just want to send best wishes? Here’s your chance.

Roaming Crazy Available on iTunes – Put it on your walkman now!

KittyPunch_BW2

We are all roaming crazy

Aw yeah, it’s official — Roaming Crazy is alive on iTunes! Only $.99 to put it on your walkman.
Search and destroy, or just click this link: http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/stares-2020-single/id424596034
If you like it hard and fast this song will make your Tuesday worth it.

-Ezraz

 

He Beat Me To It (Again!)

My boy Damon from Gorillaz is rambling forward yet again, pushing to release the first major project recorded on an iPad this holiday season. I’ve messed around with the 4-track recorders and many of the synthesizers and other iOS instrument apps. This should be an interesting test of the new platform in regards to production, something that iOS is just starting to progress towards.

I’ve put my iPhone apps into DJ sets for years but yet again the Gorillaz captain is moving the bar. Can’t wait to hear what he comes up with!

gorrilaz_660

Progress/Process… ps “I am not a whore” haha

Wow, the 2MERIMIX OPEN MIND NITE @ The Duck last night has left all involved groggy and probably a bit irritable, but time marches on, the beat goes on, the show must go on, etc..?Thankfully two bits of progress in the battle against irrelevance came through today:

— First off the next 2MERICA single just left the mastering engineer and it’s making it’s way to the tubes of the internets. Titled “Keep Steady”, it’s the 2nd of 5 tracks from the Scherzo Elskorpion LP. It’s also the ‘sex scene’ in the soundtrack so check it out! Like most 2MERICA songs, it’s a curveball that turns into a knuckleball right before you swing and miss, so yeah, stay tooned for the latest and greatest. This track is an old school sick jam with Jesus on bass, Swifty on the v-drums, some killer sax from J,?Jaimeson doing his dirty rap, lil’ Z on guitars, and Ezraz supplying the remaining noise. It should be available for purchase at the usual suspects (iTunes, cdbaby, amazon) and for streaming (Napster, Spotify, and Jango) in about a month.

— Secondly, the process of ‘going legit’ (aka getting our chit together) has continued, with a parent company formed to manage the Flux-adel Recording Division and all of it’s various progressions and proclivities. You the faithful internet cruiser won’t notice or care about this, but we are all proud and wanted to make the announcement. Collinwood Sun LLC has risen.

So yeah. My manager Fahqfasse finally got some stuff done. I get to hang out back and pee on his office, the mighty brick fortress known as FF Bookman Promotions. Which is my little way of posting status updates on his wall.

LOVE
Ezrazmus ‘elemento’ jones, founder of the round world society, 73rd generation panfunktual bonobo

ps – here’s something to cheer you up, the unforgettable Cee-Lo Green has had me singing this hook for 3 days now!

Books and Music – So much on the way

Yo humans
I’ve been feeling prolific and proficient lately
got those legs pumping and ain’t giving up no ground.So many opportunites with so little cash,
so much fun to be had makin the dash,
but I have big billskys, crying babeskys swirling around.

On I march through thick and thin
living the best in the skin I’m in.
I borrow old song lines when I post as a crutch, I know,
but my crippled ass is on a mission.
What can I say I have no rhyme but lots of reasons.

I have two books in the works
because I want to publish something beautiful for the shelf
or the table or your bag: -1 is a book of 2merica imagery and lyrics,
the other is a book of my writing, mainly poetry.
Both are in production now but I have no firm timeline. Surprise.
They will of course be for sale online.

Also, the next 2 tracks from Scherzo Elskorpion
are almost ready for mastering.
Like the debut “Never Met Tomorrow”,
they are full band let’s go all the way affairs
and I think you will dig both
“Keep Steady” and “Mass Entertainment”.

Now if I could only finish
the remaining 2 tracks and put out all 5 on vinyl
I’d be the most happiest boy alive.
That’s a nice long term goal, please check with me on that one later.


Ez

Posted via email from 2M :: REAX


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The Augmented Future Starring Headtronics

I’ve been peddling myself around town since the weather broke and damn what a beautiful city Cleveland is.

 

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The view of the east side of Cleveland, from above Cleveland Heights.

 

The near east side by bike has to be one of the finer urban rides in America: Wade lagoon, university circle, Little Italy, Case, Rockefeller Park, Lakeview Cemetery, up the hill to Forest Hills Park (formerly the home of the richest man in the world!), Cain Park, Shaker Lakes, back down the new Euclid Avenue bike lanes to the new CSU then down to the Rock Hall and the Inner Harbor….

Give me a sunny day and my Raleigh and I’m good on the northside. We started our recession 40 years ago so we are getting good at being poor.

 

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Lake Erie driftwood, aka The Lake Erie Monster

 

So with all this hopeful optimism (Obamaism?) I have to tell you about 2 new developments. First off the always funky Freekbass has joined forces with 2 others for his first “supergroup side project”. Called Headtronics and featuring a killer lineup of Freek on bass, Steve Molitz from Particle on Keys, and DJ Logic on everything else, they are finally playing Ohio next weekend so you know I will have to check that out.

 

Headtronics

Headtronics – DJ Logic, Freekbass and Steve Molitz

 

I have been a big fan of Dub Trio for a bit so I can’t wait to see the Headtronics Trio put their shingle out.

On the homefront, The Flux-adel Recording Division has been active lately, doing both final mixes on 2new 2merica tracks for Scherzo Elskorpion, and starting preliminary writing on new material with the very talented Dakota “chief” Stonerock.

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Finally — Last summer I was part of my own wannabe supergroup side project we called Roaming Crazy that managed to write and record a single song before disbanding. The track is called “Stares 2020” and is currently hanging around on the HD waiting for it’s parents to work chit out.

I hope you readers will get to hear it sometime, it’s probably the hardest thing I’ve ever produced, like way up in your face, you know, HAVE SOME! Production.

Ezzy

Ps Anyone see Roy Ayers sitting in with The Roots on Fallon last night? Hot damn I hope the roots are recording all those commercial break jams that we miss on tv for us to dig on forever after.

Update – here’s the Roaming Crazies doing “Stares 20-20”

Spring has sprung!

Green-alley-in-spring-park


So its been a long while i know
But much has been happening around me
Since i last opened my space
And your face to my reality

A new studio has sprung
Bigger harder stronger than the last one
The Flux-adel Recording Division
Is open for business. As they say,
Recording is progress

2merica is as vital as ever
Better late than never
El motto de skorpions!
Pedal hard my darlings
Cuz the devil is on our tail

Too many corporate bands biting
Our sound style idea hope
I ain’t mad at this compliment
It’s my fave way to cope
These days.

Although i admit no shortage of hope
In town and around the globe
I am watching the former foreign fear peddlers
Spin themselves into an American
Dream turned nightmare for their corporate sponsored
Worker fearing apocalyptic vision of our very beautiful
Present. Tense sense of relief.
And oh yeah we started a bad ass new band.

The Bushes have quietly waved
Goodbye and returned to Texas
and we survived.
God Bless us all, hallelujah!
Only stronger and perhaps
Smarter… yeah right
But at least our new prez
Don’t get stage fright
And talks to us like we’ve actually
Been walking on this earth more than a decade


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