Team Eye vs. Team Ear Part 1 – TV Sets Through History

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Recording allows us to store and replay something. It is the first time-shifting. It’s been around for ~ 200 years but it wasn’t until the last 100 that they really started making tangible progress for commercial applications.

Images were first. Then sound. Then moving images. By 1930 they were all combined into “talkies” – narrative moving pictures with synced sound.

These independent technologies progressed through the 20th century: Phonograph was invented and perfected to bring recorded music into the home; TV was invented to bring moving pictures into the home. The march of progress was obvious. Each new era brought better tech with better specs.

Today we are going to look at the advancement of the TV set over 70 years.


 

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You can see that overall screen size has risen linearly while pixel size has grown exponentially. Weight has come down and price, after adjusted for inflation, has come way down.

How do you think TV set history will compare with music playing equipment? Stay tuned to this series to find out.


 

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Katy Scary

The Super Bowl halftime show was a total disaster. It had none of the demographics pleased.

I was at a party with a bunch of people and their kids, some of who were teenage Katy Perry fans, and even they were cracking on her voice, her stage show, her fashion. Ouch.


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Derp


Of course the adults with an ounce of taste (or ears) were non-plussed.

The highlight of our viewing was several people calling for Timberlake to appear and pull her top off.

I also got a laugh by imagining they left her hanging in that contraption and during the 2nd half the QB’s had to throw around her.


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A proper half-time music show needs very strong material that cuts across all groups, a band and performance that can deliver physically in a way the players on the field do, and a decent amount of sex of the old-fashioned S&M-lite style that we prefer.

Katy Perry had none of the above. She’s a pretty girl but nothing in the show was sexy. Way more trippy and creepy.

Singing was horrible, no band, poor Lenny Kravitz dancing around pretending to play guitar for 1 minute. The highlight was Missy Elliot doing her 2 hits. That’s my review.